How to enable startup chime sound in Mac OSX El Capitan

OK, OK, I’m late to the upgrade party. But if it works just fine for me why upgrade?

Well in my case I needed to run Quicken for Mac which requires El Capitan <grumble, grumble>

In fact, El Capitan runs faster than Yosemite, so I’m thankful. But not for the Disk Util app, that’s a severe downgrade from Yosemite’s.

Most of all, they turned off the startup chime. I use that when walking away waiting for the 5 minute boot cycle (I wonder if there’s a boot argument to make that shorter 🙂

Anyway, I wanted this article available as at least one place where someone can google and find a way to enable or turn on the chime for El Capitan.

It’s pretty easy:

  1. Launch Terminal
  2. Enter the following command

sudo nvram SystemAudioVolumeDB=”%d0″
sudo nvram SystemAudioVolume=”%100″

Exit/quit from Terminal and reboot, if all went well the chime should sound on startup!

Amateur (Ham) Radio (Yaesu FT-991A) in Digital Mode (FLDigi) on Mac OSX (Yosemite)

I picked up transceiver radios several years as a new hobby. Well OK the year was 2008. The impetus was really the Katrina storm event, seeing all communications grid disrupted except for radio and satellite communications.

I have no satellite equipment and thought that would be too specialized and limited in usage. I wanted a general purpose way to communicate during normal and emergency times that could reach most of the population in the USA. Naturally, I gravitated to Amateur Radio, commonly known as Ham Radio. Ham Radios can communicate globally using Radio Frequency Waves, and as I found out, surprisingly they can also communicate via satellite (if you so choose, I didn’t).

You don’t need a license to get a radio and listen to Ham Radio, but you must have a license to transmit using Ham Radio. There is an exception that allows the use of Ham Radio without a license in life/death emergency situation to call for help.

My license is categorized as a “General” license. Simply put it allows me to use a larger amount of frequency than a “Technician” might have (which is an entry level license). “Extra” license gives you all the frequencies Amateur Radio … Read the rest

Create an AirPlay server using Raspberry Pi (Apple iTunes server clone)

I recently came across forked-daapd, forget what the name means. If you’ve ever setup your iTunes app as a music server, well this is a clone of that.

This means you can use a remote on your iPhone, iPad, or Android device to control the iTunes music server to play music on remote speakers (with the use of Apple’s Airport Express WiFi device).

I started with a scratch Raspberry Pi install, this time around I’m using the latest distribution of Raspbian named Stretch.

You can use instructions on this page to install Stretch on your Raspberry Pi:

https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentation/installation/installing-images/README.md

Once that is done, you’ll then want to install what is called a repository key. A repository is basically a server that contains applications you can install. A gpg key is a digital signature used to authenticate the repository.

The command to get the repository key is:

wget -q -O – http://www.gyfgafguf.dk/raspbian/forked-daapd.gpg | sudo apt-key add –

Then we want to add the following line to /etc/apt/sources.list, make sure it is the first line in the file, otherwise it will pick up an old version of forked-daapd. This adds the repository that contains forked-daapd to our software install list before the default … Read the rest

Raspberry Pi as a Mac OSX file server

Update 1/5/2017, I’ve made configuration adjustments to /etc/netatalk/afpd.conf (2nd section below) and /etc/netatalk/AppleVolumes.default (third section below). I also added a section to enable the firewall.

Update 1/4/2017, previously I was unable to make this work with Samba (Windows file sharing for Linux) but after I rebuilt the Pi and followed my own instructions I was able to make this work.

This time I want my Raspberry Pi server to behave as another Mac sharing its files. It is incredibly easy. I use the latest image of Raspberry Pi Raspbian OS Jessie with PIXEL dated 2016-11-25.

First, we install netatalk (this software provides the functionality of an AFP file server used by Macs to share files).

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install netatalk

Second, install ufw firewall if not already

sudo apt-get install ufw
sudo ufw allow 548
sudo ufw allow 5353

Third, restart services

sudo service avahi-daemon restart
sudo service netatalk restart

Third, I adjust the /etc/netatalk/afpd.conf file and use the following line at the end

– -tcp -noddp -uamlist uams_dhx2.so -nosavepassword -mimicmodel RackMac

Fourth, if I wanted to add /mnt/raid5/storage to Mac’s file share I would edit /etc/netatalk/AppleVolumes.default. At the end of the file … Read the rest

Raspberry Pi 2B RAID 5 build – Part 4 – Final

Now we install Samba which is a file sharing program for Linux, it is Linux’s implementation of the SMB file protocol used by Windows. Once installed we can connect to shared folder on the tinypute from other machines.

Update 4/14/2019, at some point before today, Samba was released without libpam-smbpass module. It was used to sync passwords between Samba and Linux’s user database. I’m about to run this post again and see how Samba works (or maybe not) without libpam-smbpass module. So far OK, no issues.

First, install Samba:

sudo apt-get install samba
sudo apt-get install libpam-smbpass

Second, configure /etc/samba/smb.conf as follows:

# Maximum number of usershare. 0 (default) means that usershare is disabled.
usershare max shares = 100 #Uncomment this line (remove the first character “;”)

[homes]
   comment = Home Directories
   browseable = no
# By default, the home directories are exported read-only. Change the
# next parameter to ‘no’ if you want to be able to write to them.
   read only = no

Third, create a folder for users to share

sudo mkdir /mnt/raid5/storage
sudo chmod ug+rwx /mnt/raid5/storage

Fourth, configure smb to share the folder, add the following line to /etc/samba/smb.conf

[storage]
comment =
Read the rest

Raspberry Pi 2B RAID 5 build – Part 3

Alright lets continue with our stock Raspberry Pi – Jessie build. It’s a long post, hang on to the handle bars!

First, install mdadm using the following commands:

sudo apt-get update #Updates our repository list
sudo apt-get install mdadm #
Accept the prompt during the installation.

Second, we’ll assume the disks are intended for a built from scratch RAID 5 array, so we’ll destroy all data on the disk (technically all we’re doing is remove previous partition table and formatting information, it could still be recovered  with data recovery software, many available on the Internet).

We’ll also assume 3 disks. More can be used, but not less than 3 for a RAID 5 array, that’s a requirement. In my case I have 3 powered external USB disks directly plugged in to the Pi.

Third, identify the disks using lsblk -o NAME,SIZE,FSTYPE,TYPE,MOUNTPOINT 

lsblk

Here are my three disks, sda1, sdb1 and sdc1 (a through c denoting the sequence of the disks). My disks are partitioned already in the above picture (we’ll talk about that below) so they have numeric sequencing for their disks (the number 1 as all use the first partition). If they were never partitioned then you’ll … Read the rest

Raspberry Pi 2B RAID 5 build – Part 2

Now we’re ready to do the semi difficult parts.

Write the Raspbian Linux OS image to the micro SD card. I use a Mac so I use the following instructions: https://www.raspberrypi.org/…/inst…/installing-images/mac.md

Note that when you are in the Mac’s System Report window, expand Hardware -> USB -> USB2.0 Hub -> USB 2.0 Hub then click on USB Storage. Or whatever you do, find that USB Storage node. In the details panel below on the right you’ll find “BSD Name”, in my case it is disk5, that’s the micro SD card we’re writing the image to (the Pi instructions missed this very tiny important detail).

system-reporthardware

If you use Windows then use the following instructions:
https://www.raspberrypi.org/…/…/installing-images/windows.md

For Macs, when you use the sudo dd command to write the image to the micro SD card, a progress update won’t be displayed. Instead press Control-T to see a status update when you want.

The process takes about 4.5 minutes on my Mac. It’ll be roughly the same on other computers as the time is dependent on the USB 2.0 port and microSD speed. I have a Class 10 micro SD card, which is pretty fast at the time this is posted.

Once you’re done

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Raspberry Pi 2B RAID 5 build – Part 1

First, you need a Raspberry Pi 2B computer. You can purchase it anywhere. It’s home is here: https://www.raspberrypi.org/

Remember to purchase a micro USB cable with a power charger which is used as the Pi’s power supply, also remember to purchase an HDMI cable.

The HDMI cable is used to display the Pi’s video output on an HDTV monitor (1080p). I’ve only used the HDMI display once to find the IP address of the Pi, after that I typically use the terminal/ssh to connect and work with the Pi.

In case they don’t come with the USB 2.0 cable (they should), also remember to buy 4 USB 2.0 cables.

Second, you need 4 USB 2.0 external hard disks. The Pi has 4 USB 2.0 ports so up to 4 disks can be connected directly. You can use more disks but you’ll have to use a USB hub. Using a hub to use more than 4 USB disks will degrade performance as a single USB 2.0 connection is shared amongst many disks.

Third, you’ll need a micro SD card, 8GB will do. This will be the Pi’s Linux OS hard disk.

Fourth, you’ll need to download the OS (it’s called Raspbian

Read the rest

Raspberry Pi 2B RAID 5 build – the Journey

This is my journey in building my own at home private cloud

It has no high availability from the processing node perspective as there is no fail-over/backup processing hardware to make this a highly available cluster. There is a solution to this as described in http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/two-pi-r?page=0,1 if you like the challenge. I might do that at another time.

This implementation only has disk high availability from 3 x 3TB USB 3.0 external disks turning this build into a nice NAS for my PCs, VMs, and laptops. We’ll see how slowly it crawls. It actually has decent performance for daily routines. Large file size & number copies will make it crawl. I just do that overnight (copied my iTunes library over).

Yes, I’m a digital pack-rat .

Go on part 1 of the journey! https://caesarsamsi.wordpress.com/2016/12/31/raspberry-pi-2b-raid-build-part-1-2/

pichristmas

Install a LAMP and mailman (mailing list) server

mailman

I needed a mail server for a few custom email addresses from several domains that I own. There are some 6 domains and 10 custom email addresses.

Multiple email domains can be hosted on a single mail server. They are called virtual domains. Basically email1@domain1.com and email2@domain2.com can be delivered to mailserverdomain.com. Clients from domain1 and domain2 connect for email service to mailserverdomain.com

This configuration moves my email addresses from outlook.office365.com which charges $5.- / month / email account. Totals to saving a sweet $50.- monthly. That’s $600.- a year which I could use for something else.

I begin by installing the Mail Server using this cookbook: LAMP + Mail Server + Web Mail Server then I install mailman using my own cookbook: mailman-2-1-23-install

This results in a Mail Server capable of hosting multiple domains with multiple emails accounts. In fact it is running in my home office on a Raspberry Pi box!

If you want something like this but skip about 200+ lines of instructions, let me know, I’d be happy to help!